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Immigrant and Refugee Resources: DACA

Highline Remains Committed to Defending DACA, Students

Dr. Jeff Wagnitz, Highline College’s Acting President, has joined the presidents of Washington’s six public baccalaureate college and universities, 33 other community and technical colleges, the 10 members of Independent Colleges of Washington, and the 10 members of Washington Student Achievement Council in a joint statement protesting President Donald Trump’s decision to terminate the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, also known as DACA, in six months.

 

“Today’s announcement leaves us with profound disappointment and pained yet unequivocal resolve to stand up for our students who are among the 800,000 nationwide registered under DACA. These young people are some of the finest and most resilient students at our colleges and universities, often exhibiting unique character forged in the fire of adversity. They overcome major obstacles just to gain and retain eligibility without access to the federal financial assistance needed by so many to help make a college education attainable.

In Washington, all of our students, regardless of their immigration status, are invaluable to the teaching we provide in our classrooms, the research we perform in our labs, and the discoveries we make in medicine. These students and those who came before them are not strangers on our campuses, in our communities, and in our homes. They are our neighbors, our co-workers, our friends and our family. They are us.

Our nation’s history has proven that education and service are essential components to sustaining communities and stimulating economic growth in addition to helping create personal success and happiness. Washington ‘s colleges and universities are working aggressively to produce graduates with degrees in science, business, technology, and medicine and a variety of other high-demand areas of endeavor. Employers in their desperate search for talented young people are already reaching out of state to fill top jobs. DACA graduates are playing and will continue to play an important role in meeting this critical need in the state of Washington. They embody the initiative and resolve that has made the United States of America the most prosperous and innovative country in the world.

This lamentable decision to end DACA threatens to rob us of hundreds of thousands of gifted, hardworking, and dedicated young people who are American in every way but their immigration status. We agree with the many business leaders throughout the country who are urging Congress to pass the bipartisan Dream Act or legislation that will allow these students to continue to contribute to the global competitive environment.”

To learn more about Highline’s position on DACA, read the January message from Acting President Jeff Wagnitz.

Resources

From Community College Consortium for Immigrant Education (CCCIE)

  • United We Dream's resources, including Top Five Things You Should Know about the end of DACA--in particular, the impending October 5th deadline for current DACA recipients to get their two-year renewals. Please share this link widely on your campuses, in classrooms, and in the community!
  • The advocacy tool provided by the American Association of Community College to voice your opposition to ending DACA and to urge your representatives to support the Bipartisan Dream Act, which is gaining support in Congress.
  • Migration Policy Institute’s latest research which shows that work authorization has helped DACA recipients contribute beyond low-skilled sectors of the economy, rising into higher-paying office jobs. Ending DACA means that "many one-time DACA recipients working without authorization will grow the country's underground economy--which undermines a level playing field for all workers--and may see their job progress stall or even reverse," MPI notes.

DACA Eligibility

Guidelines

You may request DACA if you:

  1. Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
  2. Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
  3. Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
  4. Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  5. Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;
  6. Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  7. Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

see more information from the DACA webpage  
(U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services)

DACA Resources - Community College Consortium for Immigrant Education (CCCIE)

  • United We Dream's resources, including Top Five Things You Should Know about the end of DACA--in particular, the impending October 5th deadline for current DACA recipients to get their two-year renewals. Please share this link widely on your campuses, in classrooms, and in the community!
  • The advocacy tool provided by the American Association of Community College to voice your opposition to ending DACA and to urge your representatives to support the Bipartisan Dream Act, which is gaining support in Congress.
  • Migration Policy Institute’s latest research which shows that work authorization has helped DACA recipients contribute beyond low-skilled sectors of the economy, rising into higher-paying office jobs. Ending DACA means that "many one-time DACA recipients working without authorization will grow the country's underground economy--which undermines a level playing field for all workers--and may see their job progress stall or even reverse," MPI notes.